T: 01249 460 606

09 Aug 2018

How to protect your brand

How to protect your brand

Arguably a brand name, slogan or trademark is the most valuable of business assets.  This is true for multinational companies like Coke, Mercedes or Google or small local businesses selling flowers, print services or clothes for example.

If you have put time and money in to creating and establishing your brand or business, the last thing you need is someone coming along and at best diluting the brand or worse, stealing the benefits of branding recognition. It does happen – but only if you haven’t taken steps to protect the brand or trademark from the outset.

A standout choice

If your mark or brand name is the result of many hours of research or the result of a ‘light bulb moment’, the chances are it is unique and very distinctive. It is probably something which will stand out from the crowd. It could also be capable of growing in to a brand with real value and kudos.

It will also be envied by competitors. They may not be able to steal it or use it but they can make life difficult for you and cost you money defending the mark, slogan or

Use it or lose it

If you have come up with a neat trademark, slogan or logo then use it. It will not wear out – the more exposure it gets, the more easily recognised your brand will become. As the brand recognition spreads via advertising media, so too will it spread by word of mouth or, in the case of 21st century tech, by shares and likes on social media.

A distinguished mark

No brand is more distinguished than the two marks of Rolls Royce. The Spirit of Ecstasy on the top of every Rolls Royce radiator grill and the two ‘Rs’ intertwined as the mainstay of the brand logo. They both capture the essence of the company and its brand message.

Register 

Registering a trademark, a slogan or logo is essential to preserve its integrity and for future association with your brand. The Internet age has thrown up other issues owners of business marks, brands, logos and slogans need to be aware of.

Cyber squatters can register and ‘sit on’ domain names and/or use them to their advantage and your disadvantage. They can use logos on websites and YouTube videos and you may not even be aware it is happening, thereby diluting your brand.

In summary, protecting a brand is essential to its future health, and for the protection of your hard earned money. Registering a business brand, slogan or mark before it goes live will reduce the potential for fraud and loss in the future.

To learn more about protecting your brand and increasing its value – contact us today E: [email protected] T: 01249 460 606

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